Literature In English 2018 Past Questions | WAEC

Study the following Literature in English past questions and answers for JAMBWAEC  NECO and Post-JAMB. Get prepared with official past questions and answers for upcoming examinations.

41. Othello:    Why, how now, ho? from whence ariseth this?

            Are we turned Turks, and to Ourselves do that
            Which heaven hath forbid the ottomites?
            For Christian shame put by this barbarous brawl!
            He hat stirs next to carve for his own rage
            Holds his soul light; he dies upon his motion.
            Silence the dreadful bell, it frights the isle
            From her propriety, What is the matter, masters?
            Honest Iago, that looks dead with grieving
            Speak, Who began this? On thy love, I charge thee


Iago:       I do not know

   (Acts II, Scene Three, Lines 155 – 165) 

Othello is brought to the scene because___________

  • A. Iago is drunk
  • B. A bell has been rung
  • C. People are fighting
  • D. Cassio has stabbed Montano

42. Othello:    Why, how now, ho? from whence ariseth this?

            Are we turned Turks, and to Ourselves do that
            Which heaven hath forbid the ottomites?
            For Christian shame put by this barbarous brawl!
            He hat stirs next to carve for his own rage
            Holds his soul light; he dies upon his motion.
            Silence the dreadful bell, it frights the isle
            From her propriety, What is the matter, masters?
            Honest Iago, that looks dead with grieving
            Speak, Who began this? On thy love, I charge thee


Iago:       I do not know

   (Acts II, Scene Three, Lines 155 – 165) 

 

The underlined expression refers to the____________

 

  • A. Intervention of the storm in the war
  • B. Return of the victorious army to Cyprus
  • C. Killing of Roderigo by Iago
  • D. Stabbing of Montano by Cassio

43. Othello:    Why, how now, ho? from whence ariseth this?

            Are we turned Turks, and to Ourselves do that
            Which heaven hath forbid the ottomites?
            For Christian shame put by this barbarous brawl!
            He hat stirs next to carve for his own rage
            Holds his soul light; he dies upon his motion.
            Silence the dreadful bell, it frights the isle
            From her propriety, What is the matter, masters?
            Honest Iago, that looks dead with grieving
            Speak, Who began this? On thy love, I charge thee


Iago:       I do not know

   (Acts II, Scene Three, Lines 155 – 165) 

In “Who began this” This refers to the ______________

  • A. Theft
  • B. War
  • C. Bell
  • D. Brawl
 

44. Othello:    Why, how now, ho? from whence ariseth this?

            Are we turned Turks, and to Ourselves do that
            Which heaven hath forbid the ottomites?
            For Christian shame put by this barbarous brawl!
            He hat stirs next to carve for his own rage
            Holds his soul light; he dies upon his motion.
            Silence the dreadful bell, it frights the isle
            From her propriety, What is the matter, masters?
            Honest Iago, that looks dead with grieving
            Speak, Who began this? On thy love, I charge thee


Iago:       I do not know

   (Acts II, Scene Three, Lines 155 – 165) 

To Othello, Iago is________________

  • A. Sincere
  • B. A negligent guard
  • C. Untrustworthy
  • D. A loyal senator

45. Othello:    Why, how now, ho? from whence ariseth this?

            Are we turned Turks, and to Ourselves do that
            Which heaven hath forbid the ottomites?
            For Christian shame put by this barbarous brawl!
            He hat stirs next to carve for his own rage
            Holds his soul light; he dies upon his motion.
            Silence the dreadful bell, it frights the isle
            From her propriety, What is the matter, masters?
            Honest Iago, that looks dead with grieving
            Speak, Who began this? On thy love, I charge thee


Iago:       I do not know

   (Acts II, Scene Three, Lines 155 – 165) 

 

The major consequence of the brawl is that___________

  • A. Montano is killed
  • B. Roderigo demands his money back
  • C. Cassio is dismissed
  • D. Iago is given charge of the city

46. Speaker:    I durst, my Lord, to wager she is honest

            Lay down my soul at stake. If you think other,
            Remove your thought. It doth abuse your bosom
            If any wretch have put this your head,
            Let heaven requite it with the serpents curse
            For if she be not honest, chaste and true
            There’s no man happy. The purest of their wives
            Is foul as slander
            

   (Acts IV, Scene Two, Lines 12-19)

The speaker is__________—

  • A. Iago
  • B. Desdemona
  • C. Cassio
  • D. Emilia

47. Speaker:    I durst, my Lord, to wager she is honest

            Lay down my soul at stake. If you think other,
            Remove your thought. It doth abuse your bosom
            If any wretch have put this your head,
            Let heaven requite it with the serpents curse
            For if she be not honest, chaste and true
            There’s no man happy. The purest of their wives
            Is foul as slander
            

   (Acts IV, Scene Two, Lines 12-19) 

 

The speaker is addressing__________

  • A. Othello
  • B. Montano
  • C. Duke
  • D. Roderigo

48. Speaker:    I durst, my Lord, to wager she is honest

            Lay down my soul at stake. If you think other,
            Remove your thought. It doth abuse your bosom
            If any wretch have put this your head,
            Let heaven requite it with the serpents curse
            For if she be not honest, chaste and true
            There’s no man happy. The purest of their wives
            Is foul as slander
            

   (Acts IV, Scene Two, Lines 12-19) 

 

The speech is in response to___________

  • A. The allegation that the speaker has lied about Desdemona
  • B. Iago’s disdain for Othello
  • C. Othello’s suspicion that Cassio and De

49. Speaker:    I durst, my Lord, to wager she is honest

            Lay down my soul at stake. If you think other,
            Remove your thought. It doth abuse your bosom
            If any wretch have put this your head,
            Let heaven requite it with the serpents curse
            For if she be not honest, chaste and true
            There’s no man happy. The purest of their wives
            Is foul as slander
            

   (Acts IV, Scene Two, Lines 12-19) 

The line “Remove your thought, It doth abuse your bossom” Is best paraphrased ______________

  • A. You are not wise
  • B. Do not kill yourself
  • C. You are ungrateful
  • D. You demean yourself by thinking so

50. Speaker:    I durst, my Lord, to wager she is honest

            Lay down my soul at stake. If you think other,
            Remove your thought. It doth abuse your bosom
            If any wretch have put this your head,
            Let heaven requite it with the serpents curse
            For if she be not honest, chaste and true
            There’s no man happy. The purest of their wives
            Is foul as slander
            

   (Acts IV, Scene Two, Lines 12-19) 

The character being spoken of is described as___________

  • A. Unhappy
  • B. Virtuous
  • C. Generous
  • D. Wretched

Post suggestions Here

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0 0 votes
Article Rating
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x
Scroll to Top

join

naijavarcity

Subscribe to our mailing list and get latest school news